•  

    Notes from the Dispatch-Box of John H. Watson MD

     

     

     

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      Available as paperback and ebook (Kindle) Amazon

    Notes from the Dispatch-Box of
    John H. Watson MD

    Another discovery from the vaults of Cox and Co., the old London bank which had forwarded the Deed Box of John H Watson to the author last year.

    The Dispatch Box contains all manner of illuminating documents about Messrs. Holmes and Watson. Of particular interest are what the author refers to as :

    • The Affair of the Vatican Cameos
    • The Reigate Poisoning Case
    • A document apparently written by the man Holmes himself called 'the fourth smartest man in London', John Clay.
  •  

    Further Notes from the
    Dispatch-Box of John H. Watson MD

     

     

     

    • Buy from Amazon

      Available as paperback and ebook (Kindle) Amazon

    The second box ("the dispatch-box") to be discovered in the vaults of Cox & Co. of Charing Cross has been the source of even more discoveries concerning the celebrated detective Sherlock Holmes.

    Included in this volume are four tales, all referenced in the canonical originally published adventures:

    The Abernetty Horror

    A bloody crime in a Welsh fishing village points to one seemingly obvious answer. Holmes brings his reasoning powers to bear on the parsley and butter to discover the true solution (mentioned in The Six Napoleons).

    The Finsbury House.

    "The shocking affair of the Dutch steamship Friesland, that so nearly cost us both our lives." (The Norwood Builder)

    The Curious Affair of the Archdeacon

     Mentioned in passing at the beginning of the Red Circle, this case is more light-hearted than many of Holmes' adventures.

    An Account of the Victor Lynch Forgery

    An account of an early case of Sherlock Holmes, related not by Watson, but by Inspector Lestrade, in the form of a letter to the good doctor, following the events at Meiringen. Mentioned in both Study in Scarlet and the Sussex Vampire.

  •  

    The Reigate Poisoning Case: Concluded

     

     

     

     

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      Available as paperback and ebook (Kindle) Amazon

    The Reigate Poisoning Case: Concluded

    In the account of the adventure that I have edited and entitled "The Reigate Poisoning Case", published by Inknbeans Press in the collection Notes from the Dispatch-Box of John H. Watson MD, there was no mention of any character named Mlle. Carère, nor of a subsequent resurrection of the victim, let alone a reappearance and marriage in New York. I had therefore assumed that Watson had confused two cases, and attached the name of the principal of one to the events of another.

    It turns out that I was mistaken. Watson was correct in all the details that he had originally supplied as hints mentioned in his earlier story of Dartmoor. As I was searching through the dispatch box, I discovered an envelope into which was tucked another notebook, somewhat similar to the one in which I had discovered the story of Madame Montpensier. This was the totally unexpected sequel to the story that I had first discovered--a sequel that overturned my previous assumptions.

    I therefore present to you the second part of "The Reigate Poisoning Case", which in my opinion, brings to a satisfactory close--as far as the plot is concerned, through many dubious moral aspects remain--those parts of the case that raised doubts in my mind when I was acquainted only with the first part of the story. This adventure is set some six months after the first, as the mention in Hound would imply.

     

  •  

    The Death of Cardinal Tosca

     

     

     

    3

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    The Death of Cardinal Tosca

    In The Hound of the Baskervilles, Dr. John Watson writes about Sherlock Holmes' "famous investigation of the sudden death of Cardinal Tosca--an inquiry which was carried out by him at the express desire of His Holiness the Pope." The express wishes of Sherlock Holmes, as expressed in a written note on the outside of an envelope, have been ignored, in order to bring this case before the public. "...sealed with a wax seal and the impression of a signet ring with the initial 'S'. On the back flap were written, in that splendidly sprawling but legible hand with which I am now familiar, the words 'Not to be opened before September 25, 2014'."

     

  •  

    Without my Boswell

     

     

     

     

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      Available as paperback and ebook (Kindle) Amazon

    "I am lost without my Boswell," declares Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia". But before John Watson had that fateful encounter with the eccentric beater of corpses at Barts, there was a consulting detective by the name of Sherlock Holmes, who had already built up a practice and a reputation that extended to Scotland Yard. However much he may have felt lost without his Boswell later in his career, Holmes was playing a solo game when he started out.

    The written accounts of some of these were in the dispatch-box, bound together in an envelope, in Watson's writing.

    The envelope was inscribed "Before My Time", again in Watson's hand. The stories in here are all somewhat less interesting from the point of view of the interplay between Holmes and other characters, but they all shed a light on Holmes' methods of deduction as he learned his trade, and often also shed light on his character. As Holmes himself remarked, not all of these may be seen as successes, but none of the cases here may be regarded as a complete failure. Here they are - with five original illustrations by Andy Boerger.

    The Tarleton Murders

    The Case of Vamberry, the Wine Merchant

    The Singular Affair of the Aluminium Crutch

    The Case of the Abominable Wife

    The Adventure of the Two Bottles

     

  •  

    the Dispatch-Box of John H. Watson MD

     

    3

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      Available in hardcover only Amazon

    The dispatch-box of Doctor John H. Watson, the faithful companion and biographer of Sherlock Holmes, was the second such box to be sent to Hugh Ashton, who has edited and commented on the adventures in this volume. With two exceptions, these stories have appeared previously in print, in the Dispatch-box series published by Inknbeans Press .Here, though, for the first time in one edition, in homage to the original style of The Strand Magazine, are the adventures of Sherlock Holmes in:

    The Affair of the Vatican Cameos

    The Reigate Poisoning Case

    The Reigate Poisoning Case: Concluded

    The Story of John Henry Augustus Clay (as told by himself)

    The Abernetty Horror

    The Adventure of the Finsbury House

    The Curious Affair of the Archdeacon

    An Account of the Victor Lynch Forgery (by Inspector Lestrade)

    The Russian Bear

    The Adventure of the Hand of Glory

    The Adventure of the Disappearing Spoon

    The Lichfield Murder

    The Case of the Two Detectives

    The Tarleton Murders

    The Case of the Abominable Wife

    Vamberry the Wine Merchant

    The Singular Affair of the Aluminium Crutch

    The Adventure of the Two Bottles

     

  •  

    Last Notes from the
    Dispatch-Box of John H. Watson MD

     

     

    2

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      Available as paperback and ebook (Kindle) Amazon

    Sherlock Holmes solved many more cases than were recorded in the adventures published during his lifetime.

    Doctor John Watson, faithful friend and biographer of Sherlock Holmes, nonetheless took the trouble to make notes of these adventures he shared with the famous detective, placing his manuscripts in tin boxes, which he then stored in the vault of a London bank.

    Recently, these boxes have come to light, and the tales contained in them have been edited and published.

    Here are the three adventures of Sherlock Holmes which lay at the bottom of the second box:

    Sherlock Holmes and the Russian Bear

    Where Holmes must save a friend from the villainies of Count Orloff of the Okhrana, the feared Russian secret police.

    Sherlock Holmes and
    the Hand of Glory

    A a grisly and gruesome discovery in the outbuildings of a country house. A sleepy Warwickshire village hides a multitude of secrets.

    Sherlock Holmes and
    the Missing Spoon

    It's only a teaspoon, but it is valuable and it is missing. How can Holmes refuse a former schoolfellow's request to find it?

     

Click on a drawer to open it. Hover over a book cover to reveal a link to purchase it.

 

The Dispatch-box

 

Grateful acknowledgment to Conan Doyle Estate Ltd. for permission to use the Sherlock Holmes characters created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

All titles are available directly from Inknbeans Press, or from Amazon, or other emporia where fine books are offered for sale.

Sign up for an Irregular 221Bean Baker Street Newsletter here: 221 Bean Baker Street News

These pages, The Deed Box and Dispatch-Box of John H Watson MD and other Sherlock Holmes titles by Hugh Ashton mentioned on these pages: ©2012–2016 Inknbeans Press and Hugh Ashton

Hugh Ashton's non-Sherlock Holmes titles (the Untime series and the Brian Finch-Malloy adventures) may be found at HughAshtonBooks.info

 

  •  

    Notes from the
    Dispatch-Box
    of John H. Watson MD

     

    Notes from the Dispatch-Box of
    John H. Watson MD

    Another discovery from the vaults of Cox and Co., the old London bank which had forwarded the Deed Box of John H Watson to the author last year.

    The Dispatch Box contains all manner of illuminating documents about Messrs. Holmes and Watson. Of particular interest are what the author refers to as :

    • The Affair of the Vatican Cameos
    • The Reigate Poisoning Case
    • A document apparently written by the man Holmes himself called 'the fourth smartest man in London', John Clay.

     


  • Further Notes from the
    Dispatch-Box
    of John H. Watson MD

     

    The second box ("the dispatch-box") to be discovered in the vaults of Cox & Co. of Charing Cross has been the source of even more discoveries concerning the celebrated detective Sherlock Holmes.

    Included in this volume are four tales, all referenced in the canonical originally published adventures:

    The Abernetty Horror

    A bloody crime in a Welsh fishing village points to one seemingly obvious answer. Holmes brings his reasoning powers to bear on the parsley and butter to discover the true solution (mentioned in The Six Napoleons).

    The Finsbury House.

    "The shocking affair of the Dutch steamship Friesland, that so nearly cost us both our lives." (The Norwood Builder)

    The Curious Affair of the Archdeacon

     Mentioned in passing at the beginning of the Red Circle, this case is more light-hearted than many of Holmes' adventures.

    An Account of the Victor Lynch Forgery

    An account of an early case of Sherlock Holmes, related not by Watson, but by Inspector Lestrade, in the form of a letter to the good doctor, following the events at Meiringen. Mentioned in both Study in Scarlet and the Sussex Vampire.

  •  

    The Reigate poisoning Case: Concluded

    The Reigate Poisoning Case: Concluded

    In the account of the adventure that I have edited and entitled "The Reigate Poisoning Case", published by Inknbeans Press in the collection Notes from the Dispatch-Box of John H. Watson MD, there was no mention of any character named Mlle. Carère, nor of a subsequent resurrection of the victim, let alone a reappearance and marriage in New York. I had therefore assumed that Watson had confused two cases, and attached the name of the principal of one to the events of another.

    It turns out that I was mistaken. Watson was correct in all the details that he had originally supplied as hints mentioned in his earlier story of Dartmoor. As I was searching through the dispatch box, I discovered an envelope into which was tucked another notebook, somewhat similar to the one in which I had discovered the story of Madame Montpensier. This was the totally unexpected sequel to the story that I had first discovered--a sequel that overturned my previous assumptions.

    I therefore present to you the second part of "The Reigate Poisoning Case", which in my opinion, brings to a satisfactory close--as far as the plot is concerned, through many dubious moral aspects remain--those parts of the case that raised doubts in my mind when I was acquainted only with the first part of the story. This adventure is set some six months after the first, as the mention in Hound would imply.

  •  

    The Death of Cardinal Tosca

     

    The Death of Cardinal Tosca

    In The Hound of the Baskervilles, Dr. John Watson writes about Sherlock Holmes' "famous investigation of the sudden death of Cardinal Tosca--an inquiry which was carried out by him at the express desire of His Holiness the Pope." The express wishes of Sherlock Holmes, as expressed in a written note on the outside of an envelope, have been ignored, in order to bring this case before the public. "...sealed with a wax seal and the impression of a signet ring with the initial 'S'. On the back flap were written, in that splendidly sprawling but legible hand with which I am now familiar, the words 'Not to be opened before September 25, 2014'."

     

  •  

    Without My Boswell

     

    "I am lost without my Boswell," declares Sherlock Holmes in "A Scandal in Bohemia". But before John Watson had that fateful encounter with the eccentric beater of corpses at Barts, there was a consulting detective by the name of Sherlock Holmes, who had already built up a practice and a reputation that extended to Scotland Yard. However much he may have felt lost without his Boswell later in his career, Holmes was playing a solo game when he started out.

    The written accounts of some of these were in the dispatch-box, bound together in an envelope, in Watson's writing.

    The envelope was inscribed "Before My Time", again in Watson's hand. The stories in here are all somewhat less interesting from the point of view of the interplay between Holmes and other characters, but they all shed a light on Holmes' methods of deduction as he learned his trade, and often also shed light on his character. As Holmes himself remarked, not all of these may be seen as successes, but none of the cases here may be regarded as a complete failure. Here they are - with five original illustrations by Andy Boerger.

    • The Tarleton Murders
    • The Case of Vamberry, the Wine Merchant
    • The Singular Affair of the Aluminium Crutch
    • The Case of the Abominable Wife
    • The Adventure of the Two Bottles

     

  •  

    Last Notes from the
    Dispatch-Box

    of John H. Watson MD

    Sherlock Holmes solved many more cases than were recorded in the adventures published during his lifetime.

    Doctor John Watson, faithful friend and biographer of Sherlock Holmes, nonetheless took the trouble to make notes of these adventures he shared with the famous detective, placing his manuscripts in tin boxes, which he then stored in the vault of a London bank.

    Recently, these boxes have come to light, and the tales contained in them have been edited and published.

    Here are the three adventures of Sherlock Holmes which lay at the bottom of the second box:

    Sherlock Holmes and the Russian Bear

    Where Holmes must save a friend from the villainies of Count Orloff of the Okhrana, the feared Russian secret police.

    Sherlock Holmes and
    the Hand of Glory

    A a grisly and gruesome discovery in the outbuildings of a country house. A sleepy Warwickshire village hides a multitude of secrets.

    Sherlock Holmes and
    the Missing Spoon

    It's only a teaspoon, but it is valuable and it is missing. How can Holmes refuse a former schoolfellow's request to find it?

     

  •  

    the  Dispatch-Box

    of John H. Watson MD

    The dispatch-box of Doctor John H. Watson, the faithful companion and biographer of Sherlock Holmes, was the second such box to be sent to Hugh Ashton, who has edited and commented on the adventures in this volume. With two exceptions, these stories have appeared previously in print, in the Dispatch-box series published by Inknbeans Press .Here, though, for the first time in one edition, in homage to the original style of The Strand Magazine, are the adventures of Sherlock Holmes in:

    The Affair of the Vatican Cameos

    The Reigate Poisoning Case

    The Reigate Poisoning Case: Concluded

    The Story of John Henry Augustus Clay (as told by himself)

    The Abernetty Horror

    The Adventure of the Finsbury House

    The Curious Affair of the Archdeacon

    An Account of the Victor Lynch Forgery (by Inspector Lestrade)

    The Russian Bear

    The Adventure of the Hand of Glory

    The Adventure of the Disappearing Spoon

    The Lichfield Murder

    The Case of the Two Detectives

    The Tarleton Murders

    The Case of the Abominable Wife

    Vamberry the Wine Merchant

    The Singular Affair of the Aluminium Crutch

    The Adventure of the Two Bottles