•  

    TaLES from the Deed Box of John H. Watson MD

     

     

     

     

    The Odessa Business

    In this story we see a further side to Sherlock Holmes – that of his family. For a long time we have known about his reclusive and enigmatic brother, Mycroft. Watson never allued to the existence of Evadne, Holmes‘ younger sister. She proves herself to be a true scion of the Holmes family, combining the energy of Sherlock with the raw mental capacity of his brother Mycroft. It is also refreshing to see familial affection between the siblings described in this story.

    The Case of the Missing Matchbox

    The second story here, the Case of the Missing Matchbox, deals with a bizarre crime, and also shows us a side of Sherlock Holmes which we might have guessed, or rather suspected, but which had remained unknown to us until this time. We have known from previous cases of his skill in fisticuffs, as well as in singlestick and the mysterious Japanese wrestling art with which he bested Professor Moriarty in his battle above the Reichenbach Falls. Not until this time have we had a chance to discover the side of Holmes that delighted in single combat, and not for its own sake, but on behalf of those unable to defend themselves.

    The Case of the Cormorant

    The final story in this short collection, the Case of the Cormorant, is to my knowledge unique in the canon of tales about Holmes. Watson alludes to this tale in another story, and it seems to have been regarded by him and probably by Holmes, as an “ace in the hole” to be played in the eventuality of an attack on Holmes or on Watson’s records. It is, when one reads the story, not in the least unusual or strange that Watson should have withheld it from publication. The principal figure in the case, even had he been disguised by a pseudonym, would have been instantly recognisable to any contemporary, and it is quite likely that students of that period’s history would likewise have encountered few difficulties of identification, even had the name and the location of the events described been changed. It is printed here in the hope that it will throw some light on some of the curious political machinations that occurred at this time.

  •  

    More from the Deed Box of John H. Watson MD

     

     

     

     

    Colonel Warburton's Madness

    One of the few cases recorded by Watson as being one that he introduced to Holmes (The Engineer's Thumb being the other). Taking place in a seemingly innocuous suburban setting, it is nonetheless a tale of dark secrets and hidden evil. Holmes' skill at disguise is never seen to better advantage. Watson himself likewise shines as an investigator of more than average competence.

    The Mystery of the Paradol Chamber

    Strangely named, and the mystery itself is a strange one where Holmes' talents are needed to unravel a classic "locked room" murder puzzle. Religion plays a very minor role in most of the cases described by Watson - it is interesting to see here that Holmes claims to have memorised the churches and incumbents of all the Roman Catholic (at least) churches in the English Home Counties.

    The Giant Rat of Sumatra

    The definitive story of The Giant Rat of Sumatra has come to light. There are obvious reasons why this story was withheld from the public for so long. Even with the pseudonyms that have been so obviously employed, this story could have shaken the respectable world of English politics to the core if released. The cooperation of the Royal Navy with Holmes in the solving of this bizarre mystery is another aspect that would also have been kept secret, possibly at the behest of Mycroft.

     

     

  •  

    Secrets from the Deed Box of John H. Watson MD

     

     

     

     

    The Conk-Singleton Forgery Case

    The first of these tales is mentioned by Watson. He gives no other details in The Adventure of the Six Napoleons, and the story was presumably withheld from the public on account of Holmes' brush with the police as described here. The story provides excellent examples of Holmes' skill in deduction from seemingly trivial observations, as well as details of his methods of working a case.

    The Strange Case of James Phillimore

    The next story is likewise mentioned in passing by Watson. James Phillimore is described as stepping into his house to retrieve his umbrella, never to be seen more in this world. This brief description implies a somewhat supernatural twist to things, but the truth of the matter is even more surprising. The open antagonism between Sherlock Holmes and some officers of the Metropolitan Police Force may come as somewhat of a surprise to those who have always regarded him as an unflagging ally of the official guardians of law and order.

    The Enfield Rope

    In this adventure, we enter unknown territory. Watson never alluded to this case. The principals here were far too well-known to Watson's public to allow of this case's publication, even with pseudonyms, and re¬spect for the British Establishment would have restrained Watson in this instance. Holmes' sense of the dramatic is shown here, and his admiration and liking for a member of a part of society that was often shunned at that time shows a human, more attractive side to Holmes than is often portrayed by Watson.

    The Bradfield Push

    An early case of Sherlock Holmes, where Watson loses both his heart and his watch. Holmes can retrieve one, but not the other.

  •  

    The Trepoff murder

     

     

     

    2

    The Trepoff Murder

    Mentioned by Dr. Watson in the Scandal in Bohemia, the story of the Trepoff murders now comes to light, discovered by the author in a deed box once owned by Sherlock Holmes' faithful chronicler. A Russian dignitary dies in London, and Holmes sets off to discover the circumstances behind his untimely, and politically unfortunate, demise.

    Originally told in true ACD fashion, as a serial, this brief novella is now exclusively available at Amazon for Kindle.

  •  

    The Darlington Substitution

     

     

     

     

    The Darlington Substitution

    Mentioned in passing by Dr. Watson in his account of A Scandal in Bohemia, The Darlington Substitution is a tale of deceit, treachery, and murder most foul, set in the wild Border country of northern England. Holmes and Watson encounter a centuries-old legend which tells of the future extinction of an ancient noble family, and set themselves against one of the most ingenious and fiendish villains ever to cross the path of Sherlock Holmes.

    Holmes and his faithful biographer come to life again in this case, following in the tradition already set in the three volumes of the "Deed Box" series of shorter Holmes adventures published by Inknbeans Press.

     

  •  

    the Deed Box of John H. Watson MD

     

     

    3

    Tales from the Deed Box of John H. Watson MD

    Long thought lost, the box containing the untold tales of the great detective Sherlock Holmes, deposited in the vaults of Cox & Co. of Charing Cross so long ago, has recently come to light.

    It was presented to Hugh Ashton of Kamakura, Japan, the maiden name of whose grandmother was Watson. Ashton has transcribed and edited the adventures he discovered in there, and they have been published by Inknbeans Press.

    Eleven adventures from the Deed Box series, 360 6"x9" pages reproduced in the style of the original canonical adventures, and bound together for the first time as a hardcover volume.

 

The Deed Box

 

Grateful acknowledgment to Conan Doyle Estate Ltd. for permission to use the Sherlock Holmes characters created by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

All titles are available directly from Inknbeans Press, or from Amazon, or other emporia where fine books are offered for sale.

Sign up for an Irregular 221Bean Baker Street Newsletter here: 221 Bean Baker Street News

These pages, The Deed Box and Dispatch-Box of John H Watson MD and other Sherlock Holmes titles by Hugh Ashton mentioned on these pages: ©2012–2016 Inknbeans Press and Hugh Ashton

Hugh Ashton's non-Sherlock Holmes titles (the Untime series and the Brian Finch-Malloy adventures) may be found at HughAshtonBooks.info

 

  •  

    Tales from the Deed Box of John H. Watson MD

     

     

     

    The Odessa Business

    In this story we see a further side to Sherlock Holmes – that of his family. For a long time we have known about his reclusive and enigmatic brother, Mycroft. What was never alluded to by Watson in any of the published accounts was the existence of Evadne, his younger sister. She proves herself to be a true scion of the Holmes family, combining the energy of Sherlock with the raw mental capacity of his brother Mycroft. It is also refreshing to see familial affection between the siblings described in this story.

    The Case of the Missing Matchbox

    The second story here, the Case of the Missing Matchbox, deals with a bizarre crime, and also shows us a side of Sherlock Holmes which we might have guessed, or rather suspected, but which had remained unknown to us until this time. We have known from previous cases of his skill in fisticuffs, as well as in singlestick and the mysterious Japanese wrestling art with which he bested Professor Moriarty in his battle above the Reichenbach Falls. Not until this time have we had a chance to discover the side of Holmes that delighted in single combat, and not for its own sake, but on behalf of those unable to defend themselves.

    The Case of the Cormorant

    The final story in this short collection, the Case of the Cormorant, is to my knowledge unique in the canon of tales about Holmes. Watson alludes to this tale in another story, and it seems to have been regarded by him and probably by Holmes, as an “ace in the hole” to be played in the eventuality of an attack on Holmes or on Watson’s records. It is, when one reads the story, not in the least unusual or strange that Watson should have withheld it from publication. The principal figure in the case, even had he been disguised by a pseudonym, would have been instantly recognisable to any contemporary, and it is quite likely that students of that period’s history would likewise have encountered few difficulties of identification, even had the name and the location of the events described been changed. It is printed here in the hope that it will throw some light on some of the curious political machinations that occurred at this time.

     

  •  

    More from the Deed Box of John H. Watson MD

     

     

    Colonel Warburton's Madness

    One of the few cases recorded by Watson as being one that he introduced to Holmes (The Engineer's Thumb being the other). Taking place in a seemingly innocuous suburban setting, it is nonetheless a tale of dark secrets and hidden evil. Holmes' skill at disguise is never seen to better advantage. Watson himself likewise shines as an investigator of more than average competence.

    The Mystery of the Paradol Chamber

    Strangely named, and the mystery itself is a strange one where Holmes' talents are needed to unravel a classic "locked room" murder puzzle. Religion plays a very minor role in most of the cases described by Watson - it is interesting to see here that Holmes claims to have memorised the churches and incumbents of all the Roman Catholic (at least) churches in the English Home Counties.

    The Giant Rat of Sumatra

    The definitive story of The Giant Rat of Sumatra has come to light. There are obvious reasons why this story was withheld from the public for so long. Even with the pseudonyms that have been so obviously employed, this story could have shaken the respectable world of English politics to the core if released. The cooperation of the Royal Navy with Holmes in the solving of this bizarre mystery is another aspect that would also have been kept secret, possibly at the behest of Mycroft.

     

  •  

    Secrets from the Deed Box
    of John H. Watson MD

     

     

    The Conk-Singleton Forgery Case

    The first of these tales is mentioned by Watson. He gives no other details in The Adventure of the Six Napoleons, and the story was presumably withheld from the public on account of Holmes' brush with the police as described here. The story provides excellent examples of Holmes' skill in deduction from seemingly trivial observations, as well as details of his methods of working a case.

    The Strange Case of James Phillimore

    The next story is likewise mentioned in passing by Watson. James Phillimore is described as stepping into his house to retrieve his umbrella, never to be seen more in this world. This brief description implies a somewhat supernatural twist to things, but the truth of the matter is even more surprising. The open antagonism between Sherlock Holmes and some officers of the Metropolitan Police Force may come as somewhat of a surprise to those who have always regarded him as an unflagging ally of the official guardians of law and order.

    The Enfield Rope

    In this adventure, we enter unknown territory. Watson never alluded to this case. The principals here were far too well-known to Watson's public to allow of this case's publication, even with pseudonyms, and respect for the British Establishment would have restrained Watson in this instance. Holmes' sense of the dramatic is shown here, and his admiration and liking for a member of a part of society that was often shunned at that time shows a human, more attractive side to Holmes than is often portrayed by Watson.

    The Bradfield Push

    An early case of Sherlock Holmes, where Watson loses both his heart and his watch. Holmes can retrieve one, but not the other.

  •  

    the Trepoff murder

     

     

    3

    The Trepoff Murder

    Mentioned by Dr. Watson in the Scandal in Bohemia, the story of the Trepoff murders now comes to light, discovered by the author in a deed box once owned by Sherlock Holmes' faithful chronicler. A Russian dignitary dies in London, and Holmes sets off to discover the circumstances behind his untimely, and politically unfortunate, demise.

    Originally told in true ACD fashion, as a serial, this brief novella is now exclusively available at Amazon for Kindle.

  •  

    The Darlington
    Substitution

     

     

    The Darlington Substitution

    Mentioned in passing by Dr. Watson in his account of A Scandal in Bohemia, The Darlington Substitution is a tale of deceit, treachery, and murder most foul, set in the wild Border country of northern England. Holmes and Watson encounter a centuries-old legend which tells of the future extinction of an ancient noble family, and set themselves against one of the most ingenious and fiendish villains ever to cross the path of Sherlock Holmes.

    Holmes and his faithful biographer come to life again in this case, following in the tradition already set in the three volumes of the "Deed Box" series of shorter Holmes adventures published by Inknbeans Press.

     

  •  

    the Deed Box of
    John H. Watson MD

     

    2

    Tales from the Deed Box of John H. Watson MD

    Long thought lost, the box containing the untold tales of the great detective Sherlock Holmes, deposited in the vaults of Cox & Co. of Charing Cross so long ago, has recently come to light.

    It was presented to Hugh Ashton of Kamakura, Japan, the maiden name of whose grandmother was Watson. Ashton has transcribed and edited the adventures he discovered in there, and they have been published by Inknbeans Press.

    Eleven adventures from the Deed Box series, 360 6"x9" pages reproduced in the style of the original canonical adventures, and bound together for the first time as a hardcover volume.